UWindsor Spotlight on Students

Meet 20-year-old Jordan Molloy Molloy is currently in her third year of criminology at UWindsor. Her passion for the program stemmed from a desire to help others. “I’ve always been passionate about helping people,” said Molloy. “It’s what I’ve always liked to do. In high school, I took some law classes and right away I thought, ‘This is it. This is what I want to do.’ I’ve been focused on that ever since, just been driven to try to succeed and try to get into law.” Although there were other places Molloy could go for law, UWindsor was always her first choice. “I’m originally from Windsor, I’ve grown up here since I was little and it’s a good city. People don’t realize it, but it is a good city,” said Molloy. “Aside from that, the University of Windsor is great because it is a smaller campus so you get that community feel.” As for her criminology program, Molloy said she enjoys the variety and the ability to learn about different views. “With criminology, we get a perspective of the criminal side but we also do a lot of sociology classes. So it just gives you a broader perspective of society in general. I think it’s really good to have that perspective of seeing things through different people’s lives.” Not only is she busy with her studies, Molloy is also involved in a couple groups including the Substance Education Team and the Pre-law student society which she is the president for. Molloy’s end goal is to go to law school in Windsor. In the meantime, she has also added family and social relations to her course load. That way, she can get a better sense of which route she wishes to take.

Meet 20-year-old Jordan Molloy
Molloy is currently in her third year of criminology at UWindsor. Her passion for the program stemmed from a desire to help others.
“I’ve always been passionate about helping people,” said Molloy. “It’s what I’ve always liked to do. In high school, I took some law classes and right away I thought, ‘This is it. This is what I want to do.’ I’ve been focused on that ever since, just been driven to try to succeed and try to get into law.”
Although there were other places Molloy could go for law, UWindsor was always her first choice.
“I’m originally from Windsor, I’ve grown up here since I was little and it’s a good city. People don’t realize it, but it is a good city,” said Molloy. “Aside from that, the University of Windsor is great because it is a smaller campus so you get that community feel.”
As for her criminology program, Molloy said she enjoys the variety and the ability to learn about different views.
“With criminology, we get a perspective of the criminal side but we also do a lot of sociology classes. So it just gives you a broader perspective of society in general. I think it’s really good to have that perspective of seeing things through different people’s lives.”
Not only is she busy with her studies, Molloy is also involved in a couple groups including the Substance Education Team and the Pre-law student society which she is the president for.
Molloy’s end goal is to go to law school in Windsor. In the meantime, she has also added family and social relations to her course load. That way, she can get a better sense of which route she wishes to take.

Meet Melissa Macksoud, a neuroscience and behaviour student in her second year of her master’s degree. Macksoud has been interested in psychology ever since she can remember. “Ever since I was little, I was interested in the brain and how it translates into behaviour,” said Macksoud. “It’s just so interesting how it’s just a pile of mush in your head but it controls your decisions and your emotions. It’s just amazing, really.” Her love for the subject started as a general one. As she aged, things in her life changed making her even more eager to pursue psychology. “My grandmother, she had Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease and she came down with that around when I was in Grade 7,” said Macksoud. “By then, I was really into trying to understand the brain and how diseases within the brain can really change someone’s behaviour and cognition.” In her undergrad, Macksoud actually worked in a lab that was trying to find natural health products to help alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. After that, Macksoud started working in a fish biology lab, studying how environment can change the brain.   This lab is what led her to her masters’ thesis choice, where she is looking into fish bioacoustics. More specifically, Macksoud is determining if playing a particular sound to fish for a long time can increase the amount of brain cells they have. She is also looking to see how they encode frequency in the brain through a method that there isn’t evidence for. Although it may seem like a random choice, even her thesis has personal meaning. “My dad’s a scuba diver,” said Macksoud. “So just like I’ve been interested in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease because of experience, I’m also interested in fish and always have been because of my dad.” As for why she chose UWindsor, Macksoud said being a Windsor resident, it just seemed natural. Plus, there are bonds that are created between professors and students that just can’t be found anywhere else. “You just don’t find that in other universities where the professors want to get to know you, they want to help you succeed and they know you on a personal level, not just, ‘Okay you asked me for a reference letter. Let’s look up your grade on my page of 600 students and see what you got so I can say yes you got an A in my class and you deserve to go here or there,’” said Macksoud. “Here, my professors know me. They know my name, some of them even know what high school I went to. They’re really interested in getting to know you and helping you get where you want to go.” Macksoud will be graduating in the summer of 2017 and said after this, she will be going into med school.

Meet Melissa Macksoud, a neuroscience and behaviour student in her second year of her master’s degree.
Macksoud has been interested in psychology ever since she can remember.
“Ever since I was little, I was interested in the brain and how it translates into behaviour,” said Macksoud. “It’s just so interesting how it’s just a pile of mush in your head but it controls your decisions and your emotions. It’s just amazing, really.”
Her love for the subject started as a general one. As she aged, things in her life changed making her even more eager to pursue psychology.
“My grandmother, she had Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease and she came down with that around when I was in Grade 7,” said Macksoud. “By then, I was really into trying to understand the brain and how diseases within the brain can really change someone’s behaviour and cognition.”
In her undergrad, Macksoud actually worked in a lab that was trying to find natural health products to help alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. After that, Macksoud started working in a fish biology lab, studying how environment can change the brain.
This lab is what led her to her masters’ thesis choice, where she is looking into fish bioacoustics. More specifically, Macksoud is determining if playing a particular sound to fish for a long time can increase the amount of brain cells they have. She is also looking to see how they encode frequency in the brain through a method that there isn’t evidence for.
Although it may seem like a random choice, even her thesis has personal meaning.
“My dad’s a scuba diver,” said Macksoud. “So just like I’ve been interested in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease because of experience, I’m also interested in fish and always have been because of my dad.”
As for why she chose UWindsor, Macksoud said being a Windsor resident, it just seemed natural. Plus, there are bonds that are created between professors and students that just can’t be found anywhere else.
“You just don’t find that in other universities where the professors want to get to know you, they want to help you succeed and they know you on a personal level, not just, ‘Okay you asked me for a reference letter. Let’s look up your grade on my page of 600 students and see what you got so I can say yes you got an A in my class and you deserve to go here or there,’” said Macksoud. “Here, my professors know me. They know my name, some of them even know what high school I went to. They’re really interested in getting to know you and helping you get where you want to go.”
Macksoud will be graduating in the summer of 2017 and said after this, she will be going into med school.