Art Cart Tour Enters Final Part of Seasonal Run

The Art Cart begins its tour at Dieppe Park before moving on to Windsor Sculpture Park Aug. 26. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

by Hani Yassine
The Lance – Arts Editor

Tourists and local residents alike have less than two months to learn a few things about some of the city’s most prominent landmarks.

With the summer on its way out, the Art Cart Tours are reverting back to a weekend only schedule beginning in September, which will run until Thanksgiving weekend, effectively concluding another season where people are greeted to a round trip within Dieppe and Windsor Sculpture Park.

Coordinated by the Windsor Community Museum, tour guide Jay Potts said this year’s tour activity was all around stronger compared to its previous. The tour, which is approximately an hour long, covers a three kilometre road starting at Dieppe Park. From there, Potts said the tour talks about the historical monuments in the area before moving to the cultural monuments via Windsor Sculpture Park, where over 30 sculptures on display are discussed from the artists’ profile to the interpretations of their work.

On top of being a cultural experience for tourists passing by, Potts said the tour also attracts locals who may otherwise be uneducated about the nuances of the area they’ve likely frequented.

“It just gives a lot of people the opportunity to actually see the waterfront,” Potts said. “Local people, a lot of them are people that walk, run and enjoy the waterfront, but they just don’t know anything about the artwork.”

Tour hours beginning in September will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends only. Private cart tours are available for a $50 fee, with a maximum of five people in a cart. Walking tours for larger groups of people cost $3 per person with a $45 minimum fee. Reservations are required to make with fee-based tours, which can also be offered outside public hours.

'Consophia' by Ian Lazarus, a Toronto-born sculpture artist who has been commissioned to create works across multiple continents. According to citywindsor.ca, the piece stands as a symbolic gesture towards the international border linking Canada with the United States, by linking the metal rod in the middle with the two geometric shapes. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

“Consophia” by Ian Lazarus, a Toronto-born sculpture artist who has been commissioned to create works across multiple continents. According to citywindsor.ca, the piece stands as a symbolic gesture towards the international border linking Canada with the United States, by linking the metal rod in the middle with the two geometric shapes.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

'Cordella', by Maryon Kantaroff, a Toronto-born artist looked upon as one of Canada's most recognized sculptors. The five-foot high structure is placed on a mount and contends with the themes of origin and stages of evolution. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

“Cordella,” by Maryon Kantaroff, a Toronto-born artist looked upon as one of Canada’s most recognized sculptors. The five-foot high structure is placed on a mount and contends with the themes of origin and stages of evolution.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

'Claim Post' a 10-foot long sculpture made of steel, courtesy of artist Scott McKay. According to citywindsor.ca, the piece was installed in 2012 to attract attention, becoming the 41st sculpture to be included in the park. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

“Claim Post,” a 10ft long sculpture made of steel, courtesy of artist Scott McKay. According to citywindsor.ca, the piece was installed in 2012 to attract attention, becoming the 41st sculpture to be included in the park.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

'Columns', each of them 30 feet high, was made by Ronald Zerafa with poured concrete material. The four columns on display carry an uncanny resemblence to Greek culture. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

“Columns,” each of them 30ft high, was made by Ronald Zerafa with poured concrete material. The four columns on display carry an uncanny resemblence to Greek culture.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

Royden Mills' 'Ground to Ask the Sky' was previously on display at Rhode Island's Brown University. According to citywindsor.ca, it serves as a contemplative piece by placing a relationship between the ground we alk on and the sky which we remain under. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

Royden Mills’ “Ground to Ask the Sky” was previously on display at Rhode Island’s Brown University. According to citywindsor.ca, it serves as a contemplative piece by placing a relationship between the ground we walk on and the sky which we remain under.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

'Racing Horses', a four-piece statue courtesy of UK-born artist Derrick Stephan Hudson. The multiple horses on display create an energetic three-dimensional space, reflecting the intensity found in live-action horse racing. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

“Racing Horses,” a four-piece statue courtesy of UK-born artist Derrick Stephan Hudson. The multiple horses on display create an energetic three-dimensional space, reflecting the intensity found in live-action horse racing.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

'Audio Corridor' is a stainless steel piece from Ian Lazarus. Between the spacing and the auditory remnants emitted from its design, the piece creates a tangible connection between the artwork and the location it's mounted in. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

“Audio Corridor” is a stainless steel piece from Ian Lazarus. Between the spacing and the auditory remnants emitted from its design, the piece creates a tangible connection between the artwork and the location it’s mounted in.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

A professor of fine art at York University, Ted Bieler's 'Tower Song' is made of cast aluminum at 25ft high. According to citywindsor.ca, the shadowing piece is reflective of the interplay between formal and random elements found in nature, which in turn was created with the help of the artists' interest in ancient monuments. [Photo by // Hani Yassine]

A professor of fine art at York University, Ted Bieler’s “Tower Song” is made of cast aluminum at 25ft high. According to citywindsor.ca, the shadowing piece is reflective of the interplay between formal and random elements found in nature, which in turn was created with the help of the artists’ interest in ancient monuments.
[Photo by // Hani Yassine]

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