Justice at Work Conference Helps Students With Their Future

Pamphlets are spread out for attendees of the University of Windsor’s Justice at Work Career Conference Jan. 13. [Photo by // Rhiannon Lotze]

by Rhiannon Lotze
The Lance – Contributor

The University of Windsor hosted its eighth annual Justice at Work Career Conference last week, designed to help law and social justice students define their career and life goals within their fields of study.

The conference kicked off Jan. 13 at nine in the morning in the Ambassador Auditorium at the CAW Centre and featured several guest speakers throughout the day.

The keynote speaker was Desmond Cole, a columnist for Toronto Life. He performed a speech at 12 p.m. in Moot Court of the Law building. Much of Cole’s speech focused on the topic of racism, particularly surrounding the area of carding which, in Toronto, means having police stop, question and document individuals though no crime or wrongdoing is typically being committed.

“We have been successful in fighting back,” said Cole about racism. “It’s getting to a point where we can say to the average person who has had this experience, ‘’we hear you and we believe you and we are concerned about what is happening to you and your community.’”

Cole’s most recent article, “The Skin I’m In,” told the story of how he was carded by police in Toronto more than 50 times “all because I’m black,” wrote Cole.

Following Cole’s speech and a brief question and answer period, a career fair was held in the CAW building’s Ambassador Auditorium. The day was meant for students in the fields of law and social justice to learn about different aspects of their fields and to potentially help them find a focus for their studies.

Many university students found this day very helpful, including third year law student Alisa Khan.

“It’s good to have these conferences to remind you of why you originally came to law school,” said Khan. “Having people mentor you, having people who care about the same things show you that it is a possible career path, it’s empowering.”

According to Khan, the day was very beneficial for more students than just her.

Catherine Cameron listens to a speech performed by Desmond Cole during the University of Windsor’s Justice at Work Career Conference. The conference helped students find a focus for their studies. [Photo by // Rhiannon Lotze]

Catherine Cameron listens to a speech performed by Desmond Cole during the University of Windsor’s Justice at Work Career Conference. The conference helped students find a focus for their studies.
[Photo by // Rhiannon Lotze]

Desmond Cole performs a speech at the eighth annual Justice at Work Career Conference. His speech focused mainly on the topic of racism and police carding in Toronto. [Photo by // Rhiannon Lotze]

Desmond Cole performs a speech at the eighth annual Justice at Work Career Conference. His speech focused mainly on the topic of racism and police carding in Toronto.
[Photo by // Rhiannon Lotze]

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