Philanthropy of Time – It’s More Than Just Money

The 100 Kids Who Care won the Spirit of Philanthropy award for National Philanthropy Day this year. [Photo by//Caleb Workman]

by Caleb Workman
The Lance – News Editor

There are few people in the world with the ability to give away mass amounts of money to those who need it and not everyone who can does. But, do we really need money to be a philanthropist?

A philanthropist is defined as someone who seeks to promote the welfare of others, especially by the generous donation of money to good causes. This is a great thing to do but I believe that is not all there is to it.

In our world money can go a long way as long if you have a lot of it, which not many individuals, especially students, do. Another way to look at it though is what you do with your time.

Using your time in a proactive, thorough and generous way can go much farther than giving your money away, especially if it’s blindly.

In other terms, instead of going out and giving money to a cause you don’t know much about, go out and do things to benefit people who can’t help themselves. Build a home for the homeless; bring food to the foodless and go to trips to the far reaches of the world where people need people to be.

A local group known as 100 Kids Who Care has been pushing to bring philanthropy to a new level of knowledge. Using only $10 four times a year, the group of more than 70 kids sends money to local groups to make a difference. More than that, they are actively involved to help the community with the time they set aside to make the difference.

Alison Kitts, one of the founders of 100 Kids Who Care, said one of the biggest surprises she has come across in the experience is how much the kids care.

“Children want to make a difference, they want to help, they want to be part of the difference, and if we let them they will be the ones who will change our world,” said Kitts. “I think the most impact is when the kids listen to the charity voted for come back and tell them what their money has been used for. It then becomes real and they feel they have made an actual difference – feeding the hungry at the downtown mission or buying a laptop for a child with a learning disability – it’s their time and money making an impact in their community.”

Kitts said it’s not about the money they give or how much it is, but the fact they are making a difference in their community in a way they know how.

At a previous meeting, 100 Kids Who Care donated their money to the Downtown Mission which was presented by Kylie Laporte. At their most recent meeting, Joshua Jamieson, presented for the Make a Wish Foundation and won the vote.

The children all take time out of their lives to make a difference and it doesn’t matter the dollar amount as much as it does the time and the reasons.

With this, it’s important to remember why you want to make a difference and the reason you’re doing it is for others and not for yourself.

As a non-profit founder, making money is the last thing I will ever accomplish, but it’s not about that, it’s about the difference made in people’s lives. This is something everyone should look at.

You don’t have to start a non-profit, you don’t have to give mass amounts of money away, rather I challenge you to find a way to make a difference in other’s lives and stick to it.

Be a philanthropist with your time and with your heart and turn the world to the place you want to see it.

Young philanthropist, Josh Jamieson, delivers his speech on the Make a Wish Foundation and why the 100 Kids Who Care should donate their money to that cause this term. Jamieson ended up winning the speech-off and the money raised will go towards his cause. [Photo by//Caleb Workman]

Young philanthropist, Josh Jamieson, delivers his speech on the Make a Wish Foundation and why the 100 Kids Who Care should donate their money to that cause this term. Jamieson ended up winning the speech-off and the money raised will go towards his cause.
[Photo by//Caleb Workman]

From left: Alison Kitts, Lori Seguin, Darlene Eavineau. The three cofounders of 100 Kids Who Care pose for a picture at their quarterly meeting with the children. [Photo by//Caleb Workman]

From left: Alison Kitts, Lori Seguin, Darlene Eavineau.
The three cofounders of 100 Kids Who Care pose for a picture at their quarterly meeting with the children.
[Photo by//Caleb Workman]

1 Comment on Philanthropy of Time – It’s More Than Just Money

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*